Commissioned by: Gasworks

Funded by: Gasworks, Arts Council England, The Golsencott Foundation

Commissioned by: Gasworks

Funded by: Gasworks, Arts Council England, The Golsencott Foundation

A Concatenation of Rhythms:  'La Asamblea' and 'Ciagle pod gore'  (2017)

I am working on two films at the moment, as Gasworks'  inaugural participatory artist in residence. The films have been developed closely with different generations of women from the Polish and Latin American communities in South London.

I have focussed on working with organisations that foster community solidarity among immigrant women, such as Saturday schools, playgroups, support groups and political networks. These groups celebrate cultural identity through language, history and commonalities of experience. Particularly poignant is the transmission of cultural identity from one generation to the next - usually between mothers and their children - and the tension between the celebration of the past and the necessity for the future to be different.

Over a period of months, I have  carried out wide-ranging arts workshops. These workshops explore the intersection of personal biographies - for example, the experience of becoming a mother and raising children in a foreign country - and national histories - this might be about life at the end of communism, or violent conflicts that forced families to flee abroad. Collective, creative engagement with this history becomes the basis for a process of reinterpretation, reimagination, and hopefully an empowering sense of ownership over one’s own narrative.

Material generated in the workshops has been collaboratively shaped into two lyrical, narrative films which reinterpret the complex musical and aesthetic heritage of these respective communities and their journey to Britain. Both films centre on a formidable female character, an avatar borne out of the imaginative and intellectual work of the women involved in the project.

Ciaglé pod goré (‘All the time uphill’), takes the form of an operatic odyssey up Streatham Hill.  A Polish mother is forced to confront her anxieties around the hostile atmosphere of her adopted country, and her ambivalent nostalgia towards her native one, as well as her feelings about her young son as he grows, as he must, away from her and Poland.

La Asamblea (‘The Assembly’), uses a vivacious stylised performance that takes the form of a school assembly, incorporating music, dance, and elaborate set-pieces. But rather than the children presenting to their parents, it is the parent’s own narrative that takes centre stage. A female spirit guides us through a story of migration, hardship and the binding of communities in the face of the systemic forces that threaten them.

Both films are about the transmission of cultural identity between generations. They are an exercise in imagining yourself into the future, whilst reconciling yourself with the loss bound up with that leap. They are also an exercise in imagining ourselves into the lives and experiences of others, and appreciating this kind of empathic journey as a resource for a good and common civic life.

 

A Concatenation of Rhythms:  'La Asamblea' and 'Ciagle pod gore'  (2017)

I am working on two films at the moment, as Gasworks'  inaugural participatory artist in residence. The films have been developed closely with different generations of women from the Polish and Latin American communities in South London.

I have focussed on working with organisations that foster community solidarity among immigrant women, such as Saturday schools, playgroups, support groups and political networks. These groups celebrate cultural identity through language, history and commonalities of experience. Particularly poignant is the transmission of cultural identity from one generation to the next - usually between mothers and their children - and the tension between the celebration of the past and the necessity for the future to be different.

Over a period of months, I have  carried out wide-ranging arts workshops. These workshops explore the intersection of personal biographies - for example, the experience of becoming a mother and raising children in a foreign country - and national histories - this might be about life at the end of communism, or violent conflicts that forced families to flee abroad. Collective, creative engagement with this history becomes the basis for a process of reinterpretation, reimagination, and hopefully an empowering sense of ownership over one’s own narrative.

Material generated in the workshops has been collaboratively shaped into two lyrical, narrative films which reinterpret the complex musical and aesthetic heritage of these respective communities and their journey to Britain. Both films centre on a formidable female character, an avatar borne out of the imaginative and intellectual work of the women involved in the project.

Ciaglé pod goré (‘All the time uphill’), takes the form of an operatic odyssey up Streatham Hill.  A Polish mother is forced to confront her anxieties around the hostile atmosphere of her adopted country, and her ambivalent nostalgia towards her native one, as well as her feelings about her young son as he grows, as he must, away from her and Poland.

La Asamblea (‘The Assembly’), uses a vivacious stylised performance that takes the form of a school assembly, incorporating music, dance, and elaborate set-pieces. But rather than the children presenting to their parents, it is the parent’s own narrative that takes centre stage. A female spirit guides us through a story of migration, hardship and the binding of communities in the face of the systemic forces that threaten them.

Both films are about the transmission of cultural identity between generations. They are an exercise in imagining yourself into the future, whilst reconciling yourself with the loss bound up with that leap. They are also an exercise in imagining ourselves into the lives and experiences of others, and appreciating this kind of empathic journey as a resource for a good and common civic life.

 

© seth pimlott, 2016.

Seth Pimlott

Seth Pimlott

Commissioned by: Gasworks

Funded by: Gasworks, Arts Council England, The Golsencott Foundation

A Concatenation of Rhythms:  'La Asamblea' and 'Ciagle pod gore'  (2017)

I am working on two films at the moment, as Gasworks'  inaugural participatory artist in residence. The films have been developed closely with different generations of women from the Polish and Latin American communities in South London.

I have focussed on working with organisations that foster community solidarity among immigrant women, such as Saturday schools, playgroups, support groups and political networks. These groups celebrate cultural identity through language, history and commonalities of experience. Particularly poignant is the transmission of cultural identity from one generation to the next - usually between mothers and their children - and the tension between the celebration of the past and the necessity for the future to be different.

Over a period of months, I have  carried out wide-ranging arts workshops. These workshops explore the intersection of personal biographies - for example, the experience of becoming a mother and raising children in a foreign country - and national histories - this might be about life at the end of communism, or violent conflicts that forced families to flee abroad. Collective, creative engagement with this history becomes the basis for a process of reinterpretation, reimagination, and hopefully an empowering sense of ownership over one’s own narrative.

Material generated in the workshops has been collaboratively shaped into two lyrical, narrative films which reinterpret the complex musical and aesthetic heritage of these respective communities and their journey to Britain. Both films centre on a formidable female character, an avatar borne out of the imaginative and intellectual work of the women involved in the project.

Ciaglé pod goré (‘All the time uphill’), takes the form of an operatic odyssey up Streatham Hill.  A Polish mother is forced to confront her anxieties around the hostile atmosphere of her adopted country, and her ambivalent nostalgia towards her native one, as well as her feelings about her young son as he grows, as he must, away from her and Poland.

La Asamblea (‘The Assembly’), uses a vivacious stylised performance that takes the form of a school assembly, incorporating music, dance, and elaborate set-pieces. But rather than the children presenting to their parents, it is the parent’s own narrative that takes centre stage. A female spirit guides us through a story of migration, hardship and the binding of communities in the face of the systemic forces that threaten them.

Both films are about the transmission of cultural identity between generations. They are an exercise in imagining yourself into the future, whilst reconciling yourself with the loss bound up with that leap. They are also an exercise in imagining ourselves into the lives and experiences of others, and appreciating this kind of empathic journey as a resource for a good and common civic life.

 

Commissioned by: Gasworks

Funded by: Gasworks, Arts Council England, The Golsencott Foundation

A Concatenation of Rhythms:  'La Asamblea' and 'Ciagle pod gore'  (2017)

I am working on two films at the moment, as Gasworks'  inaugural participatory artist in residence. The films have been developed closely with different generations of women from the Polish and Latin American communities in South London.

I have focussed on working with organisations that foster community solidarity among immigrant women, such as Saturday schools, playgroups, support groups and political networks. These groups celebrate cultural identity through language, history and commonalities of experience. Particularly poignant is the transmission of cultural identity from one generation to the next - usually between mothers and their children - and the tension between the celebration of the past and the necessity for the future to be different.

Over a period of months, I have  carried out wide-ranging arts workshops. These workshops explore the intersection of personal biographies - for example, the experience of becoming a mother and raising children in a foreign country - and national histories - this might be about life at the end of communism, or violent conflicts that forced families to flee abroad. Collective, creative engagement with this history becomes the basis for a process of reinterpretation, reimagination, and hopefully an empowering sense of ownership over one’s own narrative.

Material generated in the workshops has been collaboratively shaped into two lyrical, narrative films which reinterpret the complex musical and aesthetic heritage of these respective communities and their journey to Britain. Both films centre on a formidable female character, an avatar borne out of the imaginative and intellectual work of the women involved in the project.

Ciaglé pod goré (‘All the time uphill’), takes the form of an operatic odyssey up Streatham Hill.  A Polish mother is forced to confront her anxieties around the hostile atmosphere of her adopted country, and her ambivalent nostalgia towards her native one, as well as her feelings about her young son as he grows, as he must, away from her and Poland.

La Asamblea (‘The Assembly’), uses a vivacious stylised performance that takes the form of a school assembly, incorporating music, dance, and elaborate set-pieces. But rather than the children presenting to their parents, it is the parent’s own narrative that takes centre stage. A female spirit guides us through a story of migration, hardship and the binding of communities in the face of the systemic forces that threaten them.

Both films are about the transmission of cultural identity between generations. They are an exercise in imagining yourself into the future, whilst reconciling yourself with the loss bound up with that leap. They are also an exercise in imagining ourselves into the lives and experiences of others, and appreciating this kind of empathic journey as a resource for a good and common civic life.